wearability: October 2003 Archives

functional clothing design

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At ISWC I attended a tutorial entitled ìMaking Computers Wearableî. It was taught by Susan Watkins, who wrote Clothing: The Portable Environment (unfortunately out of print), and Lucy Dunne, a masters student in Apparel Design at Cornell. Susan and Lucy share an interest in functional clothing design and talked about the practical issues of integrating technology into textiles and garments. They covered topics such as weight and bulk distribution, heat and moisture dispersion, cut and fit of garments, frictional drag of fabric, the bodyís sensitivity to pressure, and other related topics.

If youíre interested in this kind of thing, you might want to subscribe to a new d-list created by Lucy and Aaron Toney from the University of South Australia. Send an email with the subject ìsubscribeî to broadcloth at hhhh dot org.

thoughts on bags

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The B-Mention line of bags from Isaburo fit closely around your torso, neck, waist, or arm. The designers seem to have found a balancing point on the very fine line between carrying and wearing these bags. I consider it an important line too, as many functional "wearables" these days involve a substantial (and usually non-ergonomic) "carry-able" component.

I question why I like the torso bag better than the ScotteVest that I mentioned in a previous post. (Though I actually wouldn't want to buy or wear either!) Both the bag and vest allow easy storage and access to items, so is it just the aesthetics of the Isaburo bag that make it more appealing to me or does it have more to do my perceived wearability of the bag? I think it's the latter, and I find it strange that a bag would afford better wearability than an actual piece of clothing.

Two other bags worth quickly mentioning...

The Isaburo Turtle bag can worn around the waist like a fanny pack or on the back like a backpack, hung from a cross-shoulder sling strap, or carried like a briefcase. Very cool that they showed concern for how bags are actually worn/carried and built in this type of versatility.

And if you're not fond of black utilitarian pseudo-fabric, check out Talene Reilly, where you can get a gorgeous pink or purple leather trim laptop bag for around $300. Just a friendly reminder that all this computer stuff doesn't have to look like computer stuff. :)

- Thanks to Helle for the Isabura images. Talene Reilly link via DailyCandy.

About this Archive

This page is a archive of entries in the wearability category from October 2003.

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